September 22, 2014

"Galileo" (streaming)


The first season of Galileo is now streaming on Crunchyroll (watch the first episode here). It's a police procedural similar to Numbers or Bones, with a physicist (Masaharu Fukuyama) in the Sherlock Holmes role. I also greatly appreciate that it's an episodic series, with one complete mystery per show.


In the second season, Yuriko Yoshitaka (seated above) replaced Kou Shibasaki as the stymied cop who seeks out the professor's advice.

More videos

No Dropping Out (reviewed here)
I'm Mita, Your Housekeeper (reviewed here)

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Comments:

# posted by Blogger Katherine Woodbury
This show is so cute! I just finished Episode 2, which I really liked (and the mystery wasn't even about the body!). It reminds me of Numb3rs and Bones and also of Jonathan Creek (the undercovering-a-magic-trick element).

The English subtitles seem pretty good although I get the impression that some things are missed in translation. In the pilot, the detective says, "My closet" in response to the physicist's question in class. I got the impression that in Japanese, that answer would have been funnier. Also, at the end of the pilot, when he realizes that she duped him with the whole "Chinese mafia" story (which was hilarious), he says something like, "I don't understand why that woman exists." Based on the expression on his face, I "heard" instead, "What is up with her?" a totally English colloquialism, of course!
9/25/2014 1:00 PM
 

# posted by Blogger Eugene
In the first episode (at around 16:40), in response to "What appliance creates heat using microwaves?" Utsumi hears maikuro ("microwave") and comes up with "Mai kurozetto" ("my closet").

The correct answer might seem obvious, except that in Japanese, a microwave oven is a denshi renji ("electronic range"), as opposed to a denki stoobu ("electric stove").

The loan word mai ("my") is a recently-adopted prefix that designates stuff that is "mine," in the sense of being one's personal property. Mai kaa ("my car"), for example.

At 55:30, Yukawa says "Mattaku shinjirarenai" ("Freaking unbelievable"). It's translated to match Utsumi's similar line a minute earlier (which lacks the emphatic mattaku).
9/25/2014 3:01 PM
 

# posted by Anonymous Anonymous
Liked the series, but loved the movie. If you haven't already, it was a really good watch.

Another similar Japanese mystery-show that is soundly enjoyable is "Trick".
9/29/2014 1:04 AM
 

# posted by Anonymous Lims
I loved the series and the movie!
It reminded me a lot of shows such as Numbers and Bones, but I do have to say I enjoyed the characters here maybe more. And many of the joke sentences were very funny and cute!

Thank you for the review and the recommendation.
10/01/2014 10:35 AM